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HE KĪHOʻIHOʻI KĀNĀWAI

a modern application of restoring our natural resources

A moderated panel discussion about the work of Hawaiʻi Island communities

to restore natural resources

Friday, March 15, 2024 from 5 – 7:30 pm

The Outrigger Kona Resort & Spa, Bayview Rooms, lower lobby level

Maunakea, Maunaloa, and Hualālai Rooms

Ulu Ching

Ulu Ching

Moana Ulu Ching is a Mother, Partner, Daughter, and kama o Kona. A lifelong lover of learning, Ulu volunteers with numerous education-focused community groups and non-profits focusing on ʻōiwi-driven learning models and efforts to bring systemic change in education in Hawaiʻi. Ulu currently works with Conservation International Hawaiʻi as a Senior Program Manager, where she is honored and privileged to work by the side of individuals, families, and communities who continue the traditions of mālama āina in a changing 21st-century world. Ulu applies community-driven and descendant-led resource stewardship approaches to contemporary management collaborations, looking to the wisdom of our kūpuna to guide research and stewardship efforts. What she does...is who she is, and the love for her people and Hawaiʻi nei grounds her in all she does.

Chris Teague

Chris Teague

 

Chris Teague is the District Biologist for the State of Hawai'i Division of Aqua;c Resources in West Hawai'i. He and his team work on various marine management activites, including marine monitoring, coral restoration, fisheries regulations, and community co-management. Before joining DAR in 2020, Chris worked and studied in California, where he focused on reef ecology and long-term fish and habitat monitoring. Chris works with a diverse set of fishers, coastal communities, researchers, non-governmental organizations, and other stakeholders in his current role towards effective, inclusive, and holistic marine resource management.

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Hannah Springer

 

Hannah Kihalani Springer is a kamaʻāina of Kaʻūpūlehu, North Kona, where she and her family homestead at Kukuiʻohiwai. Among a variety of elected, appointed, and voluntary positions, Hannah always brings kamaʻāina perspective and sensibility to her civic engagements. She presently serves on the Boards of: the Akaka Foundation for Tropical Forests, Hui Kahuwai, Kanu O Ka ʻĀina Learning ʻOhana, the Kona Historical Society, Kua ʻĀina Ulu ʻAuamo, and Mānā Christian ʻOhana. Hannah is actively engaged in community based resources management with: the Kaʻūpūlehu Marine Life Advisory Committee; the Kai Kuleana Network; the Hui Kaiāulu of the Puʻuwaʻawaʻa Community Based Subsistence Forest Area; and the Puʻuwaʻawaʻa Advisory Committee. From mauka to makai, from one generation to the next, there is work to be done … E hana nui kākou.

Mike Nakachi

Mike Nakachi

 

Mike Nakachi was raised in Waimānalo. His Hawaiian ancestry traces back to Maui. An avid fisherman and scuba diver, Mike and his family formed Moana Ohana to educate and advocate for our marine resources throughout the state. Mike has worked with our West Hawaii communities closely over the years, including shark protection legislation, aquarium fish regulations, and during the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument Expansion.

Julia Rose

Julia Rose

 

Julia Rose was raised on Maui and studied at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. She has worked in reef monitoring, community-based planning, and watershed management, and is now the Coral Restoration Program Manager for The Nature Conservancy Hawai‘i & Palmyra. Alongside communities and partner organizations, she helped launch two coral restoration pilot projects on Hawai‘i Island, and is working to develop, test, and apply restoration methods that can help Hawaii’s reefs recover and thrive.

KAUIKEAOULI

CELEBRATION WORKSHOPS

Learning of traditional practices and cultural resources

 

Saturday March 16, 9:30 am

The Outrigger Kona Resort & Spa, Convention Center Lānai (workshop check-in)

Mikayla Barnwell

Coral Gardening with Mikayla

 

This workshop will review the importance of coral reefs and how they are negatively impacted. We will also cover coral restoration basics and what we do for reef restoration here on Hawai‘i Island. There will be demonstrations and opportunities for hands-on practice with some of our restoration methods.

Mikayla Barnwell is the Coral Restoration Specialist for The Nature Conservancy’s Hawai‘i Island Marine Team. She moved to Hawai‘i Island in 2021 to complete her master’s in Tropical Conservation Biology and Environmental Science at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. She started her coral restoration career in the US. Virgin Islands, where she worked as a coral science technician for The Nature Conservancy’s Caribbean team in St. Croix.

Fee:  $10

Location:  Check-in at Convention Center Lānai

Kumu Kaʻea & Kumu Kahelelani

Oli (chant) with Kumu Kaʻea & Kumu Kahelelani

Kumu Ka’ea and Kumu Kahelelani are lifetime hula dancers, having had the opportunity to be traditionally trained from birth by their late mother, Sally Kalala Alohikea Toko. Sally was the daughter of Moses Unauna Kuulei Toko Alohikea and Mary Ka’eamoku Kahoonei and was raised in Wainiha, Kaua’i. Sally’s father, Moses was the son of the great Hawaiian composer, entertainer, and Kaua’i state representative Alfred Unauna Alohikea and his first wife Ohumukini Toko of Waipi’o, Hawai’i. Ohumukini was the daughter of Tokujiro Sato, one of the well-known first Japanese immigrants (or Gannenmono) to Hawai’i who arrived in 1868. Sally’s mother, Mary, was the daughter of Peter Kaho’onei and Kila Meheula of Waimea, Kaua’i. Sally gained notoriety as an entertainer on O’ahu and later on Hawai’i island, where she was also part of a cohort of Hulihe’e Palace dancers under the direction of ‘Iolani Luahine. Sally traditionally trained her daughters and as was customary, sent them to other kumu for additional training during their youth. 

 

Ultimately, Ka’ea and Kahelelani became kumu Nani Lim Yap students and graduates of her award-winning Hālau Hula Nā Lei ʻO Kaholoku.

Fee:  Donations accepted directly by Hālau Kaʻeaikahelelani

Location:  Check-in at Convention Center Lānai

Aunty Shirley Kauhaihao

 

Breadfruit or “ʻUlu” has been recognized as an important component in the traditional Hawaiian diet.

 

Come join us for some background information from gathering to preparation of ʻUlu, as an importance diet staple.

Introduction: Who Am I?

 

Let’s Talk ʻUlu:

      1. Ulu and its importance

      2. Planting & Cultivation information

      3. Picking – how to know when it’s ready

      4. Preparation as a dish

 

Everyone please come prepared to work as a team with workshop participants. Finished products will be shared amongst all!

Aunty Shirley Kauhaihao is a life-long resident of Hōnaunau. She has a deep commitment to breadfruit, rooted in her Honaunau, Kona upbringing and she shares the joys of ‘Ulu with people of all ages. Her unfaltering dedication to the land and people of Hawaii has inspired many.

Fee:  $25:  

Location:  Check-in at Convention Center Lānai

ʻUlu (breadfruit) with Aunty Shirley

ʻUlu – Food for our Soul

 

Breadfruit or “ʻulu” has been recognized as an important component in the traditional Hawaiian

diet.

 

Come join us for some background information from gathering to preparation of ʻulu, as an importance

diet staple.

 

  Introduction: Who Am I?

  Let’s Talk ʻUlu:

            1. ʻUlu and its importance

            2. Planting & Cultivation information

            3. Picking – how to know when it’s ready

            4. Preparation as a dish

 

Everyone please come prepared to work as a team with workshop participants. Finished products will be

shared amongst all!

 

Aunty Shirley Kauhaihao is a life-long resident of Hōnaunau. She has a deep commitment to breadfruit, rooted in her Hōnaunau, Kona upbringing and she shares the joys of ‘ulu with people of all ages.  Her unfaltering dedication to the land and people of Hawaiʻi has inspired many.

Fee: $25

Location:  Check-In at Convention Center Lānai

Momi Subiono

Momi will share Lā’au Lapaʻau, or Hawaiian medicine, through stories and legends associated with plants.

 

In this workshop, you will see and touch plants used for healing, as well as learn how to prepare healing oil for general topical usage.

Participants will take with them their healing oil made by the class.

 

Momi Subiono grew up as a child in Kāne’ohe, O’ahu. She then moved to Molokaʻi, and later on to the Hawaiʻi Island. She has been taught plant knowledge by many kūpuna, such as Lanakila Brandt, Kamuela Keoni Jenny, and world renown teachers of ethnobotany, such as Dr. Dennis McKenna, Kathleen Harrison, Dr. Gaugau Tavana, and Dr. Paul Cox, who open the doors to her traveling to Western Samoa to study in an expedition. She is a long time Hawaiian kuleana land researcher and activist and now teaching kanaka ʻōiwi how to reclaim their kūpuna as private patented lands. To heal the land is to heal the people. E ola nā pua o Hawaiʻi! Ea!

Fee:  $25

Location:  Check-in at Convention Center Lānai

Lāʻau Lapaʻau with Momi

CRAFT FAIR

Local vendors with local products.

 

Saturday March 16, 9:30 am

The Outrigger Kona Resort & Spa, Convention Center Lānai

This event and parking is free. 

ʻAHA MELE

Saturday, March 16, 2024 from 5 pm

The Outrigger Kona Resort & Spa, Hawaiʻi Lawn

This event and parking is free.  Concession and no-host bar.

Kona Daifukuji Taiko

 

Sensei Akemi Iwamoto

Kaulana Nā Pua with Kumu Pelena

Kaulana Nā Pua

Hula Kumu Pelena Keeling, of Kaulana Nā Pua a 501c3 nonprofit organization.

 

Kumu Palena ʻūniki in 2012 from Nā Lei ʻO Kaholoku, under the direction of Nani Lim Yap and Leialoha Lim Amina. Using my blessing to create this nonprofit of Kaulana Nā Pua (KNP), which is established to serve in the healing of youth ages 10-25 in our community of Kailua Kona, my mission and vision are to help our most prone population of youth vulnerable to drugs, alcohol, and teen suicide find their self-worth and self-esteem through the arts of hula, chant, and Hawaiian culture. But if we start early in our keiki lives, we can start to break the generational trauma we all face as Kanaka Maoli.

Kaʻikena - The Guys

Kaʻikena & The Guys

 

Coming from the town of Hilo, Hawaiʻi, These Guys present a four-piece reggae band exuding flavors of their island home. Each of These Guys brings their personal touch to add to the already jazzy roots of reggae.

 

Lead vocalist Kaʻikena Scanlan adds a cultural twist on lyricism that aims to

revolutionize the face of a genre the group calls, “Hawaiian Reggae”. Through elements of language, music, and current events, Kaʻikena Scanlan and These Guys offer an experience of island life through distinct perspective of their home.

Paul Battad, Jalen Balunso, Isaac Nahuewai and Elijah Scanlan.

Chadd  ʻOnohi Paishon

Chadd ʻOnohi Paishon

 

Aloha mai kakou, ʻO wau ʻo  Chadd `Onohi Paishon. Ua hanau ʻia maila ma Beverly Hills, Oʻahuaalua.

My name is Chadd `Onohi Paishon and I was born in Beverly Hills, Oʻahu also known as Papakōlea.

I would lay out my life in 3 areas; family, music & the ocean.

I am the youngest of 5 siblings and also the youngest of, 82, 1st cousins. Family has and still is a very big part of who I am. It was defined by my grandmothers and holds true till this day. Growing up my “friends” also became a part of my family and that also has continued till today. Once you are in my “bubble” it’s for life.

My grandmother, Emma Honuaiwa Halemanu, was a musician and composer. Growing up all of her grandchildren would be with her on our weekends and you were given a choice, “sing or dance.” Oh, did I also mention my grandmother also danced and taught hula. So, I chose singing and that is another area that is for life. Music has allowed me to create lifelong relationships, travel to many different places, and share thru music with many different people.

The ocean... ocean is part of my earliest childhood memories. From my father diving and fishing and sharing that love of the ocean with me to bodysurfing, longboarding, or paipo, being in, on, or under the ocean was always and still is fine with me. The ocean and our cultural revitalization of voyaging have come to define a large part of who I am.

I am the Senior Captain for a non-profit voyaging & education organization by the name of, Na Kalai Wa`a based in Waimea, Moku o Keawe.

I am a sailor, crew member, Captain & Navigator for our voyaging canoes in Hawai`i and am a part of Ohana Wa`a. I have had the privilege to sail aboard our voyaging canoes for over 35 years.

My main function in our organization is to move forward the vision and mission of our organization that was founded in 1993 following the building of our first canoe, Mauloa. We than moved into the creation and building of our voyaging canoe, Makali`i in 1995 with the support of our community. To this day we continue to serve our community thru education programs focused on voyaging and the resources that it takes to maintain and perpetuate voyaging.

I am also one of five men from Hawai`i that were initiated into a ceremony called, Pwo, by Grandmaster Navigator, Pius Mau Piailug in 2007 in Satawal, Micronesia. The five men, Nainoa Thompson, Shorty Bertelmann, Bruce Blankenfeld, Chad Kalepa Baybayan and myself, are responsible for passing on the knowledge that we have learned from our teacher and mentor, Pius Papa Mau Piailug.

ʻO wau nō ʻo Chadd ʻOnohi Paishon, eia lā!

Miloliʻi Hula ʻOhana & Serenaders

 

From the Last Hawaiian Fishing Village ... ʻO ia hoʻi ʻo Miloliʻi !

Miloliʻi Hula ʻOhana & Serenaders